Hip pain is common. It can sometimes be concerning if it is very sore, but it is rarely because of anything serious. Pain can be felt in the groin, inner or outer thigh, buttocks and can sometimes radiate down the leg. The hip is built to be very strong and is good at its job of holding your weight, walking and jumping. It is very difficult to damage.

 

If you have experienced any trauma to your hip and continue to get pain it is important to have this looked at by you physiotherapist or GP. Please visit the contact us page to see how to refer. 

 

 

What can I do to help?

 

Ice: Using an ice pack may be helpful for reducing pain and swelling. A packet of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel works well as an ice pack. Leave the peas in place for up to 20 minutes at a time. This can be repeated several times a day as comfort allows.

 

Reducing the strain on your hip: It is usually best to carry out your normal activities, but try not to overdo it. You need to pace yourself to start with and try to do a bit more each day.

 

Rest: Aim for a balance between rest and exercise to prevent your hip from stiffening up. Try to avoid the movements that are most painful, especially those that are repetitive. However, it’s important to remain generally active even if you have to limit how much you do.

Exercise: The strength of the muscles of around your hip often influences hip pain. Keeping the mobility in your hip is important in rehabilitation.

A little post exercise discomfort is not uncommon and not a sign of damage. If you experience pain that regularly lasts for more than 30 minutes after exercise and feel that overall your pain is worsening please stop all exercises and seek advice from the physiotherapy department.

Sit to stand

Sitting on the edge of your chair either with hands on the arms of the chair or across your body. Slowly push up through your legs and your arms till you are fully standing.

Sit to stand

Single leg balance

Standing in front of a support practice talking one leg off the floor. If you need to use the support then hold on.Practice increasing the amount of time you hold your balance for.

Single leg balance

Clams

Laying on the floor or you bed, lay on your side with your legs bent. Keep your ankles together and slowly rotate your top leg to lift your knees apart. Make sure that your hip and back does not roll backwards.

Clams

Calf raise

Standing with a support in front of you, lift your heels off the floor. Slowly lower back down to the ground. If you feel able to lift one leg off the ground and lift the other heel off the ground.

Calf raise